Want to reduce your stress – but how? colouring-in? horses?

(c) Tom Campey After the Lasceaux cave paintings

(c) Tom Campey After the Lasceaux cave paintings

People have been colouring-in for thousands of years. I’m betting it was soothing after a difficult day hunting with a stone axe – or even an iron – axe.

Colouring-in can reduce your stress and calm anxiety – it’s like the reciting of chants or mantras but more fun. Your brain works just enough to slow the turmoil of stress or anxiety but not so much that your concentration is drained.
And being around horses has long been recognized as therapeutic for many kinds of stresses.

So I’ve got together with two artists to make …. The Coloring Book of Horses. Stress Reducing Art Therapy.

By Lesley Lodge

Drawings By

Antonio Reche-Martinez and Tom Campey

Paperback on Amazon

This book offers two sorts of colouring-in:

· The first section has patterns and landscapes for your detailed colouring – any colour you like.

· In the second section, you can colour in real or imagined horse colour combinations and markings. There are over fifty colours and colour combinations for real horses – there’s a list of the main real colours towards the end of this book.

But, hey, this book also has some unicorns, mythical flying horses and sea-horses. You can use any colours you like.

Most of all, this book is aimed at having fun! After all, as the old saying goes, a good horse is never a bad colour.

The Coloring Book of Horses Stress Reducing Art Therapy

Self-publishing – and Horse colours (tips please!)

Writing coming off hold! I’ve been a little quiet on the twitter/blog front recently. What happened was that the combination of hungry horse and awful winter weather (not to mention very long winter) here in Bedfordshire (UK) has meant that the grassy green field turned into a sludge brown field. So I’ve sent the hairy cob away to an equestrian centre in the next county over, for some expert schooling and to rest the field. Meanwhile, I’ve been picking up horse droppings, re-seeding the field and laying down fertiliser. Result: a few green shoots and a glimmer of hope for more.

So now, back to focus on the writing. I’ve now read no fewer than five of those books about how to succeed with self-publishing and marketing your e-book. Some of the main lessons in all these books (now they tell me…) are about things you should do BEFORE publication so I’ll be trying these out. One piece of advice many of these books give is about self-publishing on Kindle and then being able to give away free copies on selected days. Now neither of my e-books (“Lights! Camera! Gallop! The Story of the Horse in Film” and the short story book “Because it is Written”) are in my control so I haven’t been able to do the give-away thing. But I’m determined to publish the new one myself through Kindle Direct Publishing.     

So, I’m starting the new book now. The plan is to aim it at a younger audience than Lights! Camera! Gallop! The Story of the Horse in Film and I’ll give it a more playful focus. There will be some horse film stars in it and lots of pictures. It’s going to be about the huge variety of colours horses can have, and the different names for them (sometimes the same colours have different names in the UK and USA). The colour of a horse is often carefully considered in film-making and there’s been a whole raft of theories about the symbolism of a horse’s colour. Just as a director might have definite views about whether to choose a dark haired actress such as Angelina Jolie or a blonde like Reese Witherspoon, he or she would also decide carefully between a black stallion, which might hint at, say, power, mystery, secrecy or even death, or a white one, which would traditionally suggest innocence, light, sun, vitality or resurrection.

Such interpretations of colouring are not set in stone and are sometimes reversed, as for example a pale horse might symbolise death. The star horse in the various Black Beauty films, being all based on the book of the same name, had of course to be black in colour but his character was also very carefully and very strongly shown to be good: brave, faithful and patient. Then there is my own favourite colour: the Palomino. I’m thinking Roy Rogers’ Trigger or the legendary talking Mr Ed.

So, I’d very much value your input as I start this project:

Have you a favourite horse colour?

Have you an anecdote about horse colours?

And – have you any hints on marketing self-published books or on the Kindle Direct Publishing please? 

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